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Solarpunk

Solarpunk

INTRODUCTION What happens if the Greens win? I mean not just win elections, but win comprehensively, so much so that there’s no need for a Green party anymore. What does society look like in this scenario? To answer that question we need to look at Green’s imagined futures. There are many such and include anarcho-primitivism and (rarely) ecofascism, but the most attractive is arguably Solarpunk. So let’s look at that. SOLARPUNK Solarpunk is a literary and artistic movement, not a…

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Guilt and Shame

Guilt and Shame

I am an adoptive father, twice over. Like all adopters, I have been mandated/encouraged/enabled to undertake a range of training and education on how the minds of children develop and work, and how trauma and neglect can affect that. Many adopters say lightheartedly that we are lucky, because all parents should have access to what we learn. A lightbulb moment for me was encountering the concept of the different mindsets of guilt and shame. I feel strongly that understanding this…

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Stodge’s third and final look at the locals

Stodge’s third and final look at the locals

As we reach the final week of campaigning before the local elections next Thursday, time for a final look at some of the barometer councils where the results may not only set the immediate media tone but give a pointer as to the state of public opinion with an election within the next nine months. I’ve chosen eight councils currently controlled by the Conservatives but there are all-up elections this year due to boundary changes add a level of interest….

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The history of gambling

The history of gambling

INTRODUCTION Social issues in the United Kingdom are often done with one side or the other claiming to be on the “right side of history”. But their knowledge of history is usually lacking. So the question was: what does history actually teach us about the resolution of social issues? The history of gambling has much to inform us on this. Let me explain. 1000-1845: THE RICH AND POOR COLLIDE Throughout the second millennium gambling was divided by class and moderated…

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A closer look at the local elections

A closer look at the local elections

The second of my threads on the forthcoming local elections looks at two southern coastal councils which should be the epitome of rock-solid Conservative territory but this year will be representative of that party’s current electoral strength or frailty. These are among eight District Councils which normally elect by thirds but which, due to boundary changes, are having all-up elections this year. Fareham sits between Southampton and Portsmouth. The local council (which also includes part of the Gosport constituency) has…

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What are the key races in this round of local elections?

What are the key races in this round of local elections?

There’s obviously the London Mayoral election, ten other Mayoral elections and the PCC contests but I’m going to look at a key Council. Nuneaton & Bedworth Council covers all or part of the Conservative-held constituencies of Nuneaton and North Warwickshire. The Conservatives took control in 2021 and in 2022 when half the 34 seats were contested, strengthened their hold and currently have 27 seats with Labour on 5 and the Greens on 2. Boundary changes have increased the seat number…

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Transhumanism

Transhumanism

INTRODUCTION On May 15 2023 Mary Harrington gave a keynote address at the London National Conservatism Conference. She expanded on her work on transhumanism, doing her audience the courtesy of believing that they could understand her thesis. The NatCon audience work more by gut than thought (with some notable exceptions) but those that did have the wit to follow her were treated to a clean delineation of one of the political issues of our time: the transhumanist axis. SUMMARY OF…

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Oh dear, Rishi looks like a limpet

Oh dear, Rishi looks like a limpet

Britain’s two longest-serving prime ministers since the 19th century – Margaret Thatcher (11 years, 208 days) and Tony Blair (10 years, 56 days) – have at least one thing in common. They both decided to work in parliamentary terms of four years (approx) and to seek re-election on each occasion in either May or June. They won every time – each PM adding two re-election wins to their victories from opposition.  Perhaps they recognised that voters feel happier in Spring…

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